Archive | Photos RSS for this section

Sheepskin Cabin Trip Report

The acid hadn’t quite kicked in yet, but I could definitely feel the moorings holding my mind to this reality loosening. It wasn’t planned that I found myself on top of a big-ass line in the San Juan mountains tripping, but I came into this trip telling myself to have no expectations and to just roll with it.  Didn’t quite plan on this.

20160308_170645

Staples

The rest of the crew was already back at the sleds on the other side of the magical wilderness boundary where the machines, beer and about a pound of Durban Poison waited. We had skied two big runs already, the first a huge, classic San Juan death funnel, choking out down low and spitting out onto an apron.  The second was a surreal run, skiing steep fingers through red red rock towers deep in the range.  Its not often you can put a group of eight through these types of runs here, but the snow pack was green light after a couple weeks of clear warm weather with a solitary storm dropping about a foot on top of a rapidly consolidating early spring snow pack. The elevation was above 12000 for the cabin and terrain, which left the north, west, and even east aspects up high with a creamy smooth pow layer. The snow reminded me of AK orange peel texture snow in the spring, and skied and held as good as you can hope for a continental snowpack. The weather was perfect as well, bluebird and light winds. Green means go.

 

20160311_080653

Casa De La Send

Our crew was a pack of 9 senders, all capable skiers and riders, with a pack of high-end sleds at our disposal in a vast wilderness with no one else for miles.  We were all here to ski, ride and party, taking a needed break from the Vail valley ski season, deep in our respective jobs serving those that come here to catch a glimpse of the life that we live. Usually a group this large is a pain to organize, but everyone was ready to get after it and capable. Patrollers, photographers, ski bums, the love for skiing was well represented.

20160310_113251

The Boys Getting Ready in Spire World

Hunter S. Thompson would’ve been proud is all I can say. Epic night sled missions punctuated days of sled accessed touring, climbing and sending. Sleds allowed us to bring anything we needed to this amazing cabin. Drinking, guns, sleds, skiing pow, food, party favors.  Pretty much all time.

20160310_115251 (1)

Spire World

Our group had spaced a large portion of the meat products and cheese at the hotel in South Fork, but that was the only snafu of the entire trip. Too much Durban too early in the morning had contributed to the meats being left  in the mini-fridge at the Allington Inn in South Fork.

 

20160310_091301 (1)

Classic San Juans.

 

I had spotted the line instantly when we got to the cabin. It was by far the most esthetic line in the immediate terrain. A winding steep entrance onto a huge steep face and into the basin. The far right line in a half dome face littered with old avi crowns and mando entrance lines with no way out, it was the only skiable line on the face and it was a gem. I mentioned it a couple times, but no one seemed to hear. So I waited.

Our two runs required us to skin out right under this face, so I had time to study it and look. The snow, weather, group dynamics, snow pack were all pointing to  a go.  All I needed was the opportunity.  I wasn’t going to rely on anyone to make this happen.

The x factor was on a skin change over on our way out of our two runs. Quiet, reserved, baller skier, J Tsunami produced a “20 minute J” and ten strip of L. We were a group of four of the nine putting our skins on and shooting the shit, reviewing the runs at a cluster of stunted avi hammered pine trees.

“Hey, I have a 10 strip of acid.”

Everyone looked at him, at each other, and burst out laughing. The line of the trip by far, now and forever.

Now my big  party days are long behind me, but at that  moment I couldn’t think of a reason to say no.  Here, deep in the San Juans, there was plenty of room for one’s mind to roam free and soar. What the hell…

It’s been a long time since I twisted myself is such a way.  The skin continued on, through the basin, up and out.  Things started getting weird around the time I crested the ridge, and assessed the situation. Everything was getting brighter and louder and starting to shimmer.  The crew had headed left back to the sleds, across the ridge. I looked left, then I looked right.  Over to the right, the line of the trip waited.  Suddenly, I wasn’t tired.  I was elevated. I was waiting for my spirit animal to appear. What I got were two ravens flying low in looping circles up the skin track. Good enough.  I  turned right and headed up the skin track to the low ridge cutover to the top of the half dome.

20160310_140335

Daytripper

 

imagejpeg_0-4

The Half Dome

I remember being on top of the line, looking down the concave 55 degree entrance chute rippling like a white water bed.  I didn’t have much time before things got seriously unhinged.  Check the snow and go time.   The first three turns in the chute was blower and deep, then gravity took hold and onto the apron. Shit flew by warp speed.  I had time to make one sweeping turn to avoid the exposed moraine below the run. I wanted to gap it, but realized that I was going way too fast to do that. Around, down and hauling ass to the skin track laughing like a loon.  It was over.

The skin out was a face-melter. By the time I crested the ridge again a permagrin was plastered on my face.  D had mercifully jetted over on the sled, into the wilderness terrain, to save me a slog out.  I had hoped that he had gotten the shot from across the ridge, but he wasn’t expecting the warp speed velocity of the run and missed it. The free ride out was much appreciated, and he was instantly forgiven. I had gotten to ski it and that was enough.

Back on the ridge was a party going on. I had wondered if the group was pissed for holding them up, but they were psyched, hanging out drinking beer and watching the show unfold. Hi fives and a beer…A moment of pure ski bliss.

We headed back to the cabin for a night of debauchery. Those of us on the paper watched the others lap the log rail and ski the pow shots near the cabin.  I was seriously torqued and headed upstairs to hide from the sun for a while.  It was an overwhelming urge after being stuck in a white salad bowl for hours.

20160310_180509 (1)

Back Deck

A tripping vampire, I emerged downstairs after the sun went down, after a few tacos and several beers.  Switching to tequila for the leveler, the night unfolded and the slednecks took the opportunity to rip it in the huge lower pow meadows for hours.  I laid on the couch, became part of the couch and chilled. J Tsunami guarded the fire with his white shades on.  We held down base camp as the others brapped around till the late hours.

 

20160310_220332

Night Mission

Not often a trip comes together so well with so many green lights. This one did. It will live in infamy for many reasons. For me it was an opportunity to ski something amazing and get ready for Alaska. The three day hangover was worth it.

20160310_174831 (1)

The Oracle.

 

 

 

 

Skiing Zee Cross Couloir!

I love saying the word couloir, because the only correct and reasonable way to say it is with an over the top French accent.  This makes me happy.  In addition to saying the word couloir, I have found that I enjoy skiing them.  It’s weird, but I just do.  Here’s a little story about a couloir at the top of the world that turns dreams into realities.

 

Ross and I had been talking about skiing Mt. of the Holy Cross all winter.  It is the easily most iconic line visible from Vail, where the both of us grew up skiing. The couloir is a giant cross of snow etched across a massive rock wall.  We had already done a few big missions this season and our confidence and enthusiasm were high.  It was early April; spring was approaching and the marginal amount of snow was melting.  We knew we had to do it very soon or have to spend another year wishing we had.  The problem was that we didn’t have snowmobiles, because we suck.   The Cross is deep in the wilderness and the approach without sleds would add a day to the trip.  So I thought of another plan.  I had been ski touring off the back of Beaver Creek a bit and had been eyeing up the access to Holy Cross. I google earthed a route from the top of the Beav back along a ridge to Mt. Jackson.  From Jackson, it’s a ski down to the valley and then skin up to the bottom of Holy Cross, spend the night around the Bowl of Tears and ski the Cross the next day…..easy.

I got Ross stoked on the idea and the weather looked great for a couple days.  Time to go!  We organized our food and camping gear together to spend one night out.  We split the four season tent, food and Ross carried the Jetboil.  Add in some mountaineering equipment and toilet paper and we were outfitted to slay the dragon.

We met up the next gloriously blue and calm morning.  I left my car Subrina at the bottom of Tigwon road and we took Ross’s Jetta (Dick Magnet) over to B.C.   You feel like a true boss strolling through ritzy Beaver Creek village with mountaineering packs and ice axes.  After saying hola and bon voyage to the homies at Surefoot we got on the chairlift and began the journey to Mordor. We started skinning off the top of the Cinch lift.  The skin to the top of BC (the Bald Spot) is a lovely mellow pitch at about 1.25 miles.  It took us about 45 minutes.  From there we were able to see our entire objective.

“What’s that?” asked Ross.

“Holy Cross” I said.

“Sweet, its right there!”

“Yep, I’m a genius”

 

What did appear farther away was Mt Jackson, which Ross observed and noted.  I agreed but we decided to head towards it and see how it went.  We skied down the back of Beav and skinned across Grouse Mountain.  The weather was holding strong and blue but the wind picked up reminding us that we were outside in the high alpine.  From the other side of Grouse we determined that Jackson was still pretty far away.  We decided it was a better idea to bypass skiing Jackson and take a more direct route towards Holy Cross since that was our main objective.

It was a leisurely ski down Grouse through open, rolling trees for the first half.  Then we got in to the trees and the snow became a little sparse, then we got to the dirt.  The last 1,000 feet down to the valley was entirely melted.  We put our skis on our packs and down hiked through the woods, cursing occasionally.  This was turning into the adventure I expected.  We finally made it to the river valley below, which was snow covered.  We looked back up at Jackson.  The exposure of the bottom was a bit better so if we had skied it, we could have skied almost the entire way to the valley floor.  It would have been more skinning but we could have avoided that whole walk through the woods. We were still making decent time though.

IMG_2349

Jackson from the river valley below

 

 

 

We had lunch in the valley and started skinning up the Holy Cross side.  It was steep zig zagging through woods.  We eyed up pillow lines that might be worth a 6 mile skin.  The snow was sticky and started to glop up on my 10 year old untreated skins.  Nobody brought glop stopper.  This when the going got a little tougher.  I found the best way to knock the snow off was by whacking my skis with my rental poles.  This worked great until I snapped my pole in half sending one end boomeranging away.  I recovered the half of my pole and continued on with one and half.  Learning experiences! Thankfully the snow had gotten less sticky at the higher elevations.

IMG_2355

up and over the shoulder of holy cross down to camp

 

 

It was late afternoon now and Ross and I hadn’t talked in two hours.  We made it to the ridge of Holy Cross past where the hiking trail goes up, and looked down at a nice place to camp.  We skied about 800 feet down an icy chute to a perfect camp spot.  It was flat, it had a cave, and there were trees nearby so we could gather pine bows to put under our tent.  Camping in the belly of the beast is not something I will soon forget.  I also repaired my broken pole with two sticks and duck tape.

IMG_2357

camp from inside the cave

 

 

We awoke at dawn and had coffee and oatmeal in the tent.  We gathered only the necessary gear together and started skinning up to the bottom of the Cross Couloir.  It felt great not to have a heavy pack.  The sky was blue and the wind was calm.  We skinned around to the north east side of the peak and started zig zagging up to entrance to the couloir.  It was firm but we knew it would be corn by the time we came down it.  We made it to the entrance of the couloir and got our first really good look at it.  She was beautiful. Tall and thin with subtle sexy curves. Consistently steep up to blind rollover entrance and flanked by two rock walls.  One other surprising feature  was the single track down it!  Some solo shredder  apparently got it the day before. Touché. We switched over to crampons and ice axe to start boot packing up.

IMG_2372

booting up zee couloir

 

 

 

IMG_2377

zee top

 

The snow was ideal for boot packing.  Kind of like a cream cheese corn mixture with blower in there too.  The boot pack was the most fun part of the trip so far.  We felt confident in the snow pack, the weather was great, and I was hiking up the freaking Cross Couloir with my buddy.  The top of the couloir is the steepest part.  It was exciting hiking but not gripping, just extremely fun.  We made it to the summit which was a bit windy.  The view from the top of Holy Cross is one of the best in Colorado.  360 degrees of snow capped rockies from Denver past Aspen.  We soaked it in for a bit and had some tea and crumpets.

IMG_2383

summit selfie

 

 

So without further adieu we skied her.  I let Ross take the honors.  The top few turns were firm and I skied slow and cautiously.  After a few turns the snow softened.  The sunny side of the couloir was corn and the shaded side powder.  I gained some confidence and started lacing some smooth turns exploring the different aspects of the couloir.   I stopped halfway down to let my slough go and give the legs a break.  Then I charged it down staying closer to the wall and the snow was powder almost the entire way.  I had a couple face shots and some of the best turns of the season, in definitely the sickest place I’ve been all season.  I exited on the right before the couloir closes out to a mandatory rappel and met up with Ross.  Even though we had hiked up it we were still shocked at how good the snow was.  Also my stick repaired pole held up perfectly.  It doesn’t get any better than this.  Now we had another thousand feet of corn down to the Bowl of Tears.

 

We made it back to camp and packed up our stuff and headed out.  We ended up following the ski track of the solo person who skied it the day before.  It lead us to the way out perfectly like a guiding forest angel.  We were completely spent by the time we made it to Subrina and so happy about the whole adventure.  We didn’t ski Jackson, but we got the Cross in epic conditions and we did it without sleds.  Nature taught me a few lessons and I gained deeper appreciation for the mountains near my home.  The next day I went to Alpine Quest and bought glop stopper.

IMG_2384

Colorado, Alaska, and a Viking Funeral…

It’s been a year since I split to Maui and longer since the last post on this site and after a year on the rock I was ready to delve back into the winter world….especially after watching a 10 foot tigershark swim through the lineup at the Cove break in south Maui the Saturday before I left. Check please…

20150427_161442

Missed the entire season so this has little relavence to anything East Vail, but I found  my way back to Vail for closing day debauchery and got on the hill for one day. An after closing Roger’s Run was nothing short of epic.

Able to hook up with Deuce, Dave and Matt L. and his Dad for some quality over quantity turns on Vail pass after the late season storm rolled through bringing north winds and a couple feet of snow layered on top of a firm spring pack. We saw no natural avi activity on any aspect, save for some sun warming on S and E aspects with minor rollerballs and sluffing off sun warmed rock areas.  The skiing was creamy goodness on the N and W.

Matt's nice double Uneva peak

Matt’s nice double Uneva peak

Hooked back up with Dave to take a look around Berthoud pass for a day. Fraser and Winter Park are areas so close to Denver but managing to stay funky and rural. Good terrain and access and got 20 inches from the same storm. Pretty settled by the time we got to it. We ended up grabbing some low hanging fruit off the top for some more good spring skiing.

This high altitude training was in preparation for the AK leg of my trip. I was hoping surfing and hiking would keep me in the game for the microseason but there was some time needed to sweat out the Mai Tais  and salt water. Two choices on my first few runs, stroke out or make it to the summit following tech binding tourers. Touch and go for the first few laps but luckily I made it on the big  skis and Dukes. Oh yeah, I can still say the alphabet too. Success.

Berthoud

Berthoud Pass

Hit Girdwood AK at the tail end of a low snow year salvaged by a big April but then hit by big rain down low the week before I arrived. It left low to no snow on lower elevations but still significant snow up high. The season was very warm overall and produced a rapidly destabilizing isothermic snowpack that was slowly creeping upwards in elevation with each warm spring day. Pretty much nailed the last few days of the season on the pass.

Turnagain pass on the Kenai peninsula offers some of the coolest touring terrain.  There is an epic non-motorized side that preserves the gnar for those willing to sweat for it (leave your Epic passes and credit cards at home).

With the low snow pack putting the kibosh on a motorized season on the other side of the pass, Turnagain was silent and empty. Exactly what I was looking for after a year on an island with 144000 people. What I missed most for the last year was mountain air…nothing like it.

Pastoral and Kickstep

Pastoral and Kickstep. Got to earn these….

Three days of beautiful weather allowed me to tour and window shop for future trips while skiing some fun stuff. The spine walls were mostly melting out so staying safe and on supportable snow on N and W aspects was paramount.  S facing slopes were heading rapidly towards a large shed cycle and cornice failures were already causing step down wet slides. Some superficial melt freeze with the clear skies during the time I was there, but the pack was waterlogged down low and the ship had sailed on the season. Glad I got what I could.

 Cornice chunk from Sunburst ridge...different group

Cornice chunk from Sunburst ridge.

The end of the trip for me signified also the end of an era in gear. That’s right, the 207s,  (196s after I chopped the skegs off with a hacksaw for better touring capabilities) time had come.

Just chucking them seemed too mundane, so in true Sunset Rider Inc. fashion( a subsidiary of  EVI) a Viking funeral was the only option. I grabbed a lighter and some lighter fluid from the Tesoro at the Alyeska turnoff and headed out to the Portage Glacier for a ritual sacrifice. It’s AK, you can burn shit pretty much where ever you want.

Valhalla!

Valhalla!

Learned that Maker Dukes explode when burned and that it takes some doing to send the 207s to Vahalla, but finally they went. One way to save on baggage fees headed back to the rock…

Aloha!

1/2/14-1/3/14 And let the games begin….

Sunny and bluebird day after the day long storm that brought elevated winds good snow and low vis for a great day of storm skiing on Wednesday. Scooted around the north facing trees for both laps and enjoyed skiing the new snow as it accumulated. Nothing better.

Thursday was the busiest day of the year(myguess) for Vail mouintain. Took an hour to weave my way through the throngs to get out. Found that the parade was on, regardless of the poma being open or not.  Bluebird and about a foot of new.

Wind slab concerns as the upper scarps of Benchie and Old Man’s were loaded. First run in Old man’s I found myself skirting the edge of a pocket release in the first slot skier left of treeline, rider triggered, as tracks entered by the rock band that creates the reef at the first rollover. Didn’t propagate beyond the width of the pocket or beyond the depth of the new snow, about 50 feet wide and ran to the beginning of the flats.SS-AS-R1-D1 new snow old snow interface, soft wind slab. My run was uneventful, excellent skiing conditions in settling pow.

East facing warming quickly with intense sun,but early teleline tracks looked good in the morning. West Wall still not quite fully covered from it’s wall to wall rip a few weeks ago. Eying up the corner pocket, but will wait for another storm before testing it. Probably my favorite mandatory run in EV, gets the adrenaline going and usually something is following you, so sticking it is necessary.  It’s the closest I’ve come to using the float 30 after blowing the landing and getting hit in the back by the following slab. I, being infallible, blame the elf shoes I was wearing at the time, Damn JJ’s.Sold them for a month’s rent in Bham.  Saw a set of tracks through there today, Friday, nice to see it held above the rock band after the trees for those two.

Second run spotted Matt B. and friends through gunbarrell, then skied through secret chute to trees, getting the goods in the dark north facing. Slots in benchie still a little boney for my taste, picking through the shrubbery not my preferred way to run there, but props to them for  sticking it through there and sending it. As evidenced by the four foot trees guarding Mushroom Rock, it’s still a little thin to run clean.

Good to see the usual suspects still around, and the crop of senders half my age as well. Hope we all have a safe year out there. See you on the skin track.

IMG_20140102_120142N

Merry Christmas from EVI

It’s Christmas madness here in the valley. As I sit writing this, a visiting family is playing in the snow drifts below my second story window. Two kids are grabbing chunks of large icicles that have fallen from my roof and rollIng around the snow. Another kid, along with the Dad, are chucking snowballs at the remaining six foot skewers as the two others play underneath. They are oblivious to the Darwin award they are about to win. Ah yes, Christmas. There’s a metaphor here somewhere for EV travelers.

Had a chance to get out to to Tfalls on Saturday and dig a pit on a 35 degree NE facing slope by the entrance to the chute. Found very shallow conditions 80 cms, defined by two major layers. Settling denser storm snow on top of the typical Colorado basal facet layer, with two buried surface hoar layers in between. The loose facets underneath the recent storm snow have the stability of table salt. Two column tests were CT 15 and CT 17 with a Q2 shear on both. Hard to really qualify the shear as it was more of a crumble than anything else. Reports of lower pockets in trees pulling out in Racquette Club and Bighorn chutes as the basal facets give way under the weight of riders, especially lower down where the snowpack gets extremely shallow. Definitely calming down avalanche wise later in the week as the couple feet has time to settle. The snowpack isn’t nearly as reactive as earlier in the week, but lurking wind slabs and shallow spots by rocks and trees still provide areas of concern for trigger points especially N through E aspects.
Also noticed surface hoar formation, two to three millimeter as Saturday was humid calm and warmer. Sunday was colder and a few inches of new covered the surface hoar. Something to watch with more snow in the forecast.
The big news of course is the EV avalanche video that has gone viral and made it to CNN. Lucky for them the snowpack was shallow, later in the season it would of been a full burial. Interesting enough, Adam and I skied left Abe’s first thing that morning in the middle of the storm cycle, skiers right of the slidepath and had minor movement in the main choke.
Really nothing out of the ordinary for EV as far as the snowpack and early season avi cycles, the change is that technology is now allowing everyone to witness the game that is played out there, good or bad.
Sunday afternoon was a nice break from the busy opening week of EV. Bluebird, sparkling snow and noone out in the zone. A chance to take a breath, enjoy a solo lap in the forgotten trees and get ready for the reset and the interesting stories it will bring. Say tuned.
IMG_20131229_144402
IMG_20131229_142258

EVI on the River

Looking at J’s video from the West Wall today inspired me to write a post. Check it out, looks like a sweet bluebird day in ol’ EV and a nice run. Makes me a little misty…
Don’t have much snow info for you all, Mt. Baker still exists and the nonstop weather here has ended for the time being  revealing the Cascades cloaked in feet of the white stuff.  Bluebird here hurts the eyes at first, takes a little while to get used to it after four weeks of constant snow and rain. The energy around town immediately picks up, the vampires here absorbing the UV’s and turning back to day walkers. Will get up there when I can, but starting somewhere new requires more work, less play.
Been occupying myself with learning and guiding some of the local  rivers, many which run year round. Trying to get ready for the whitewater season here on the Sauk and Suiattle rivers. Fast and loggy, they both provide a different challenge than most of the Colorado rivers and are a challenge for any rafter, especially during the spring runoff.  The northern Cascades are chock full of snow to melt, the coming season shaping up to be a good one so far(starting  after an AK ski trip I hope.  Snow is starting to fall up north in the Chugach finally after a drought cycle.)

It’s eagle season here and that’s a big deal. Thousands of eagles, Balds and Goldens alike travel down from Alaska and Canada to feed on the spawning salmon in the Skagit River basin. The river, fed by rain and snowmelt from the towering Eldorado and Glacier peaks, contains all five species of salmon, as well as steelhead and rainbow trout.  The might Skagit runs emerald green and crystal clear, a big wide beast of a river headed to the Puget sound, 10 billion gallons every day. Seattleites flock with here with the eagles, toting five thousand dollar cameras, clad in Gore-Tex, ready to capture the action. They  turn the tiny rural river  towns of Marblemount and Concrete into bustling tourist havens for a month or so.

The eagles sit perched on branches overhanging the gravel bars at turns in the river. The mottled dying and dead salmon wash up on these bars and provide an easy meal for the eagles and their young.  One trip I had we saw 190 eagles. I was told by a veteran river guide here that was a below average day. Pretty cool to see.

I try to stay in the loop as much as I can as far as EV concerned. Read about the snowboarder that launched a cliff and took a ride sometime back.  More recently, I heard someone ran Benchie and ripped out the whole thing. I’m wondering if Old Man’s has ran yet wall to wall. Sounds like Deja Vu all over again, assuming the existence of persistent loose facets below the new snow like last year.  J’s run looked solid.  Typically the East facing West Wall snowpack sets up differently than the shaded Northern aspects of Old’s and Benchie.  Just hearsay, however, from a recovering EV addict at large. Hope everyone has a safe year.

 

 

skagit

Eldorado Peak/Skagit River

The End Of The Road….For EVI

Driven out of Vail  like the mighty lynx out of Cat 3 , I, Martineast found myself on the road in search of new terrain.  The factors had come down from the universe and it was time to go. Really the death of the Visti Bahn was too much to bear.  For me, that signaled an end of an era in Vail history and for me personally, my stint in Vail. That’s right, EV won’t have Martineast to kick around anymore.   I look forward to the first report of conditions, I expect another touchy year with the early snowpack resembling last years’ junk underneath, but I can’t tell you for sure.

Wyoming, Utah, Idaho. Drove through all of these and had the urge to keep going.  Washington. Pac-NW it is. Mt.  Baker sounds good, why not? World record snowfall, middle of the Northern Cascades. No Condos, 125 dollar tickets or fur stores. A sick little resort resort tucked away from the world high in the Northern Cascades. Bellingham, the closest real town, is 50 miles away.

Different from Vail? About as radically different as you can get. Land of moss, weed, wool and hanging seracs. Volcanoes, ice, crevasses, glaciers. At the end of WA-542, Mt. Baker sits below Mt. Shuksan, an imposing Cascade wedge with a massive serac hanging from it. A couple day lots, couple of base areas and that’s it. Possibilities for backcountry around Baker. Endless. When you can see, that is, as weather is a constant off the ocean. Literally, the end of the road.  Next stop B.C.

It’s been a long time since anything inbounds has required a second look to ski. I’ve been lulled into complacency by our wonderfully groomed golf course. Baker, however, has it all over. Better bring your A-game. Steep slots and trees runs, roll overs exceeding any point of repose in Colorado. Covered ice, rime spines, snow ghosts. Sidecountry that dwarfs the resort. Bottom line, if planet Hoth had a ski area it would be Baker.

Spent time out the gate my first afternoon to check out the snowpack. Dug my pit on a North facing 28 degree angle slope just above the gate, right off the skin track. Snow total, 305 cm depth on December 13. T his was before the current four foot snow cycle that has since closed the road. Results on my two columns dug to 160cms: CT-build a house out of it. Incredulous at the results of my first attempt at column failure, I recut and dug the second with the same result. It took all my weight and pulling on the second column as well to get a Q2 shear at 130 cms, way off any scale. Cascade snow pack is for real. I’m sure things have changed of late, our latest cycle has come with big wind, so we’ll see the impact of that. (63 inches in 4days, 100 plus trees down on the road up. Resort, I mean ski area,  is closed for three days to clean up  and dig out, truly a wild place on earth.)

Learning a new area isn’t overnight. I have no comfort level with the backcountry terrain here. My initial day had good vis and what I could see just on an EV length jaunt outside the area was vast and varied. Trees and spines, convex rolls and chutes endless are calling. In due time. It was good just to get my hands in snow and get a general idea of local conditions.

Here to relearn it all. I guess that’s the reason for the move. Look forward to the posts from Vail,  Luke in Jackson, Me in Baker. EVI worldwide. Note: we plan on being in AK again if the snow shapes up, so stay tuned…

Image12132012101920

Baker parking

Image12132012152116

Some layers of the concrete differ, but the result is bomber

Image12132012104939

Baker inbounds

Snow Plot Madness

As we here at EVI wait for the snow  to pile up and the lifts to start running here in Disneyworld west, we’ve been racking our brains to figure out what we can give you, intrepid reader, to enhance your upcoming EV experience.  We’ve come up with the obvious answer in an information driven world. Data.  Snow data from a couple different plots will be available this year.  Pretty simple info, but should give those hungry for numbers something to look at besides the posts and keep you up to date on new snow and snow depth.   One at Beaver Creek  HQ, one in West Vail, and one up top of Benchie somewhere soon, (hopefully).  So much data you’ll be able to roll around in it, build a nest in it if you like.

The first storm in November  dropped 17cm of snow here at BC (not quite the 54 inches that Alta got), with cold air temps, -8.5 C  and light winds here at 8200 ft on 11/11.   Temps are trending warmer for the rest of the week. Hopefully it will snow without another extended dry period.

That’s it for now folks, have a safe opening day on the strip o’ death,  see you all soon.

10/28/12 Thoughts On Our First Layer

Took a drive tour over Loveland Pass  coming back home from the front range yesterday.  Stopped to hike the dog up  the eastside ridge at the summit of Loveland pass.  Stomping through freshness layered in among the scree it was great to get smacked in the head with 0 degree, 30 mph winds under  a cobalt grey sky.Stood into the wind  and took  a breath of the cold. The jet stream was whipping clouds overhead, obscuring the tops of the highest peaks off the Divide,  blasting eastward. Snow was falling and the wind was transporting it  in great swirls on the open faces of the pass, steadily erasing whats left poking through the snow. Off in the distance, A-Basin looked better than it did all of last year, lifts churning on a busy Saturday,  snow in the tress .There were even a few intrepid souls braving seriously early season conditions on the West side of the pass, skiing down to the lower switchbacks . Looked to be about 8 inches of fresh on top of  a  60 mile deep granite base. Admire the love, a little early for myself. Drove over a mitten in A-Basin”s cross walk. coming down the pass.  No hand in it.  Ahh winter. It’s back.. At least above 11,000 feet.

Back in our world, EV is covered in its first layer of the white stuff. I drove back over Vail pass looking   the notorious layer that is the foundation for  our snowpack. Usually for us in Colorado this  becomes a  loosely faceted  layer that sets the stage for an avalanche cycle in mid to late November in EV and can dog us for the entire season,  depending. Last season Old Man’s early season was perfect example, sliding to the ground in November.

This first snow set the stage for the crown jewel of a  garbage Continental snowpack in 2011/2012. Early October snow with a long  long period of  clear, warm weather created  2-4 mm very loose facets out of the first snow. Surface hoar also reared its’ ugly head. When we finally did get some snow, it came with wind and the results….well you remember. The snow pack never recovered.

Our best hope is continued snow without a third Indian summer before the larger snow load arrives.  As bad as last year was ,two years ago was the textbook for a decent  snowpack. fo us. Snow, snow and more snow, consistent temps and little wind. “Average” year ? I’d take it. 

Every year is different and fascinating in our world, , not only because of the endless variables that affect our  snow, but the endlessly variable human element as well.  You can’t make the stuff up that happens out in EV. Keeps me coming back and I can’t wait to tell the tale this year. See you soon at the bus stop. EVI.

EV late October

First Snow. Bring It.

Walked the roommates dog  this afternon among the firing snowguns of Beaver Creek shrouded in falling snow from the first decent storm of the year.  Matt’s video officially dusted off the website and ended our cyber-hibernation. The walk through the falling snow broke me out of my own. Found some interesting ways to spend the off-season, but  when it comes down to it, it’s  all just killing time until it snows again.

It’s dumping as I write this and my mind wanders to pow skiing.  Having a few more weeks before the lifts turn, be fore we tell the tale of yet another EV season, we sift through memories of an epic trip.  Moved some photos over to wp from the fb highlights from our tour from Thompson Pass to  Hatcher to Turnagain Pass. Check ’em out. Hoping to end  this season in similar style,  but first we have a season to ski. Ready?

Sled/hike off the Worthington Glacier

Earning the turns

Base Camp at the old Thompson Pass airstrip

First week in April downtown Valdez

Serac we crossed under after skiing Girls and on our way to Acopolco

Just like the climb up off the Poma…

<span>%d</span> bloggers like this: